In 2003, Tatuaje released a new series name Cojonú, a shortened version of cojonudo, a Cuban slang word that means ballsy in a somewhat obvious reference to the strength of the blend. When it was announced, the line was supposed to have a new release added every three years though there were not releases in 2015 and 2018.

Last October, Tatuaje shipped one of those “missing years,” the Cojonú 2015. Measuring 5 x 55, the robusto gordo vitola features a blend that is the same as other Cojonú releases, including a Nicaraguan habano wrapper covering a Nicaraguan double binder and Nicaraguan filler tobaccos.

Since the debut of the series, the Cojonú was said to be based on Tatuaje’s Selección de Cazador line—better known as the Brown Label due to the color of its bands—though it uses more ligero in the filler to give it a stronger profile.

Note: The following shows the various Tatuaje Cojonú releases over the years. Some of these cigars may have been released after this post was initially published. The list was last updated on Jan. 24, 2023.

  1. Tatuaje Cojonú 2003 (6 1/2 x 52) — 2003 — Regular Production
  2. Tatuaje Gran Cojonú (6 1/2 x 60) — 2005 — Regular Production
  3. Tatuaje Cojonú 2006 (5 1/2 x 52) — 2006 — Regular Production
  4. Tatuaje Cojonú 2009 (6 3/4 x 48) — 2009 — Regular Production
  5. Tatuaje Gran Cojonú Reserva (6 1/2 x 60) — 2011 — Limited Production
  6. Tatuaje Cojonú 2012 (6 1/2 x 52) — 2012 — Regular Production
  7. Tatuaje Cojonú 2012 Capa Especial (6 1/2 x 52) — 2012 — Regular Production
  8. Tatuaje Cojonú 2012 Reserva (6 1/2 x 52) — 2012 — Regular Production
  9. Tatuaje Cojonú 2003 Reserva Broadleaf (6 1/2 x 52) — 2017 — 5,000 (Boxes of 10 Cigars, 50,000 Total Cigars)
  10. Tatuaje Gran Cojonú Series A (5 x 60) — 2019 — Limited Production
  11. Tatuaje Cojonú 2003 Series L (4 x 50) — 2019 — Limited Production
  12. Tatuaje Cojonú 2021 (7 x 58) — 2021 — Regular Production
  13. Tatuaje Cojonú 2015 (5 x 55) — 2022 — Regular Production
85 Overall Score

Cojonú has always been one of Tatuaje's most aggressive blends, so it is no surprise that the 2015 version just about knocked my socks off with its combination of black pepper, spice and overt strength, all of which became a bit overwhelming in the final third. Having said that, there is some very nice—albeit much too light—pomegranate sweetness that shows up on the retrohale, especially in the middle third. In addition, the score was hurt by a surprising number of burn issues on two of the cigars, although my last cigar was virtually flawless in that regard. Make no mistake: this is a strong, aggressive blend, but even at this point in its life it does show some promising nuance at times and it will be interesting to see how it changes with some resting time in the humidor.

The Cojonú 2015 is made by My Father Cigars S.A. in Estelí, Nicaragua and shipped in a singular 5 x 55 robusto gordo vitola that is priced at $13 per cigar and $273 for a box of 21 cigars.

  • Cigar Reviewed: Tatuaje Cojonú 2015
  • Country of Origin: Nicaragua
  • Factory: My Father Cigars S.A.
  • Wrapper: Ecuador (Habano)
  • Binder: Nicaragua
  • Filler: Nicaragua
  • Length: 5 Inches
  • Ring Gauge: 55
  • Vitola: Robusto Gordo
  • MSRP: $13 (Box of 21, $273)
  • Release Date: October 2022
  • Number of Cigars Released: Regular Production
  • Number of Cigars Smoked For Redux: 3

Thick and a bit on the stubby side, the Tatuaje Cojonú 2015 is covered in an attractive dark chocolate brown wrapper that features a decent amount of oil along with some very obvious mottling. In addition, all three cigars have quite a few visible veins and are sandpaper rough to the touch. One of the three cigars features a small soft spot just below the secondary band. The aroma emanating from the wrapper is medium in intensity and is made up of generic nuts, leather, earth, barnyard and honey sweetness along with a light vegetal note. The foot is closer to medium-full and features notes of gritty earth, peanuts, dark fruit sweetness, espresso beans, black pepper, tobacco and more barnyard. Finally, after a punch cut, the cold draw brings flavors of black pepper, salted peanuts, leather tack, cocoa nibs, sourdough bread and very light fruity sweetness.

I was expecting spice and black pepper from the start of the Cojonú 2015 and the cigar does not disappoint in that regard. There is plenty of both—along with a strong gritty earth flavor—after I light the foot. After about 10 puffs, the earth flavor is joined by a strong oak note at the top of the profile, both of which are followed by additional flavors of leather tack, espresso beans, powdery cocoa nibs, citrus peel and sourdough bread. One cigar—during the finish—has some of the vegetal notes I first noticed on the wrapper’s aroma but it does not appear in the actual flavor profile. In addition, there is a massive amount of black pepper and quite a bit less pomegranate sweetness on the retrohale. Flavor ends the first third at a solid medium, while the body and strength are a bit higher at just over medium. In terms of construction, two of the cigars need a couple of corrections each, but the draw and smoke production on all three cigars are excellent.

Thankfully, the combination of black pepper and spice calms down noticeably during the second third of the Tatuaje, allowing more flavors to show through in the profile. Those include main notes that now include pepper-incrusted steak and oak, along with secondary flavors of earth, leather, dry hay, sourdough bread and slight cinnamon. The pomegranate sweetness now has some room to grow as the black pepper on the retrohale recedes, but the former is still not anywhere close to strong enough to a main note. Flavor bumps up to just over medium and the body stays put at a point just over medium, but the strength increases to land at medium-full. Unfortunately, while the draw and smoke production on all three cigars continue to have no issues, two cigars, once again, need a couple of corrections each with my lighter to keep on track.

The final third of the Cojonú 2015 features not only a return of the spice and black pepper to the forefront of the profile but also a significant increase in the strength level, all of which throw the balance off noticeably by the time the cigar ends. Main flavors of oak and earth easily take the top spots, with secondary notes of dark chocolate, espresso beans, hay, cinnamon and slight citrus peel flit in and out at various points. On the retrohale, the black pepper becomes more aggressive, all but drowning out the pomegranate at times. Flavor ends the cigar at medium, while the body hits medium-full and the strength easily punches through into a solid full. Thankfully, only one of the cigars needs any attention with my lighter when it comes to the burn, and the smoke production and draw on all three cigars continue to give me no issues until I put the nubs down with an inch remaining.

Final Notes

  • If you are wondering, Cojonú is pronounced Co-ho-nu.
  • As Charlie mentioned in his review of the 2021 release, Cojonú is one of the rare cigar lines that is produced in two separate countries. Some of the sizes are rolled in Doral, Fla., while other sizes are rolled in Estelí, Nicaragua. Given that the García family owns and operates both factories, this is more just a neat fact and not something that would concern me. Furthermore, my understanding is that the difference is related to size. The older vitolas are made in the U.S., whereas newer vitolas—like this one—are made in Nicaragua.
  • Yes, this is a stronger cigar than the Tatuaje’s T110. It also features a more aggressive black pepper and spice mix.
  • While the cigar shown off during the 2022 PCA Convention & Trade Show featured a secondary band with a black background and gold details, but the production version has a gold background with black trim that matches the two previous releases.
  • Tatuaje has hinted at releasing a Cojonú 2018 in 2024, but the company has thus far not committed to that plan.
  • My second cigar had a cap that was coming off before I even got the chance to cut it, so instead of tempting fate and trying to cut it I just pulled the cap off completely to get an opening and it worked like a charm.

  • The construction was not great: two of the three cigars needed numerous corrections with my lighter to keep on track, and there were some very obvious issues as this photograph of my second cigar shows.
  • The cigars smoked for this review were purchased by halfwheel.
  • Final smoking time for all three cigars averaged one hour and 39 minutes.
  • If you would like to purchase any of the Tatuaje Cojonú 2015 cigars, site sponsors Atlantic Cigar Co., Cigars Direct, Corona Cigar Co. and Famous Smoke Shop have them for sale on their respective websites.

Update (Jan. 25, 2023) — The original version of this story indicated the wrapper was habano from Nicaragua. It is habano from Ecuador.

85 Overall Score

Cojonú has always been one of Tatuaje's most aggressive blends, so it is no surprise that the 2015 version just about knocked my socks off with its combination of black pepper, spice and overt strength, all of which became a bit overwhelming in the final third. Having said that, there is some very nice—albeit much too light—pomegranate sweetness that shows up on the retrohale, especially in the middle third. In addition, the score was hurt by a surprising number of burn issues on two of the cigars, although my last cigar was virtually flawless in that regard. Make no mistake: this is a strong, aggressive blend, but even at this point in its life it does show some promising nuance at times and it will be interesting to see how it changes with some resting time in the humidor.

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Brooks Whittington

I have been smoking cigars for over eight years. A documentary wedding photographer by trade, I spent seven years as a photojournalist for the Dallas Morning News and the Fort Worth Star Telegram. I started the cigar blog SmokingStogie in 2008 after realizing that there was a need for a cigar blog with better photographs and more in-depth information about each release. SmokingStogie quickly became one of the more influential cigar blogs on the internet, known for reviewing preproduction, prerelease, rare, extremely hard-to-find and expensive cigars. I am a co-founder of halfwheel and now serve as an editor for halfwheel.