Salem, Mass. Raises Tobacco Purchase Age to 21

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The Salem Board of Selectmen has made its city the first in the county to increase the minimum age to purchase tobacco products from 18 years of age to 21.

The board voted for the increase by a tally of three in favor to two opposed after hearing from approximately 15 community members, according to the Gloucester Times, most of whom spoke against the proposal. Opposition ranged from the fact that people would simply go to a neighboring town to purchase tobacco products, while others cited 18 as the age of adulthood, which includes going to war and voting, and as such should include being able to purchase tobacco.

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Both traditional tobacco products and e-cigarettes, as well as any nicotine delivery product fall under the new age restrictions. Enforcement will be handled through a series of compliance checks, with violations including fines and suspensions of a retailer’s tobacco sales permit, including the revocation of a permit after three violations.

The date for the change has not yet been decided, and will be scheduled for a future board meeting.

Salem is home to approximately 42,000 residents.

Update (August 12, 2014): The original version of this story indicated that Salem was located in New Hampshire. It is is a city in Massachusetts.

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Patrick Lagreid
About the author

I strive to capture the essence of a cigar and the people behind them in my work – every cigar you light up is the culmination of the work of countless people and often represents generations of struggle and stories. For me, it’s about so much more than the cigar – it’s about the story behind it, the experience of enjoying the work of artisans and the way that a good cigar can bring people together. In addition to my work with halfwheel, I’m the public address announcer for the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks during spring training, as well as for the Salt River Rafters of the Arizona Fall League, the WNBA's Phoenix Mercury and the Arizona Rattlers of the Indoor Football League. I also work in a number of roles for MLB.com, plus I'm a voice over artist. I previously covered the Phoenix and national cigar scene for Examiner.com, and was an editor for Cigar Snob magazine.

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