Null
Null
Null

While at an event at Tamura’s Fine Wine & Liquor in Hawaii, Jesus Fuego decided to produce a limited edition of the popular 777 Corojo blend called “Paka.” which means “tobacco” or “smoke” in Hawaii.

Says the people at Tamura’s:

Null

The “Paka” is based off the 777 Corojo blend, but was kicked up a little to add some more spice. It has a pig tail cap and a “closed” foot. The purpose of the closed foot is so the smoker can get a little more taste from the wrapper leaf when they first light the cigar.

There were only 200 boxes of 21 produced and each cigar has the signature covered foot and pigtail and comes wrapped in cellophane.

J Fuego 777 Corojo Paka 1

  • Cigar Reviewed: J. Fuego 777 Corojo Paka
  • Country of Origin: Honduras
  • Factory: Tabacos de Oriente
  • Wrapper: Nicaraguan Corojo
  • Binder: Nicaraguan Corojo
  • Filler: Nicaraguan Corojo
  • Size: 4 1/2 Inches
  • Ring Gauge: 52
  • Vitola: Robusto
  • MSRP: $5.99 (Boxes of 21, $125.79)
  • Date Released: August 2011
  • Number of Cigars Released: 200 Boxes of 21 Cigars (4,200 Total Cigars)
  • Number of Cigars Smoked For Review: 3

The cigar itself is a great size with a short pigtail that reminds me of a Viaje Exclusivo and a covered foot. The wrapper is a great chocolate brown that glistens with an abundance of oil and is quite smooth to the touch. It has some give when squeezed, but is just short of rock hard, and has no soft spots. The wrapper smells strongly of hay, chocolate, leather and cedar. The cigar seems almost overly packed with tobacco and is very heavy for its size.

The first third starts off with notes of leather, creamy wood, and earth. Very interesting combination of flavors to start. There is a bit of sweetness in the background that comes and goes as well and very little spice, but I do detect some pepper on the retrohale.

J Fuego 777 Corojo Paka 2

The second third starts out much the same as the first, but then the flavors morph into more of a nutty, earthy, gritty profile. The sweetness is still there in the background, but noticeably less. Still very little to no spice, and less pepper on the retrohale than in the first third, i.e. almost none. Strength is a non-factor and is no more than a mild-medium at this point.

J Fuego 777 Corojo Paka 3The final third does not change much overall — a bit more earth, a bit more wood (cedar) and still not much spice or pepper. An easy cigar to nub.

J Fuego 777 Corojo Paka 4

Final Notes

  • Interestingly, while “paka” means “smoke” in Hawaii, the term “pakalolo” is slang for marijuana.
  • Although this is a different blend than the regular 777 Corojo, the band that is used for this release is the same band as the regular release cigars. However, interestingly, the box used for this release is different, with the word “Paka” on the top and inside lid.
  • While this blend is supposed to have more spice then the normal 777 Corojo, I honestly did not taste that much of a difference between the two versions.
  • The vitola is wonderful and I am a sucker or a pigtail and closed foot.
  • The construction on both samples were excellent, as was both the burn and the draw.
  • The final smoking time for both samples was right at one hour and 30 minutes.
  • If you would like to purchase some of the J. Fuego 777 Corojo Paka, they have a few boxes left. Just call Tamura’s Fine Wine & Liquor at 808.735.7100 or visit the store’s website.
83 Overall Score

While I enjoyed this cigar, it really was just another blend in a sea of thousands and honestly, I just did not taste that much of a difference between the Paka and the normal Corojo blend. Having said that, the J. Fuego 777 Paka, like the other 777 blends, is a great value, especially in its smaller size. I would not turn one down if it was offered to me and I will probably buy a fiver to see how they change in a year or so, but I would not go out and purchase a box unless you are a huge fan of the blend.

Null
Brooks Whittington
About the author

I have been smoking cigars for over eight years. A documentary wedding photographer by trade, I spent seven years as a photojournalist for the Dallas Morning News and the Fort Worth Star Telegram. I started the cigar blog SmokingStogie in 2008 after realizing that there was a need for a cigar blog with better photographs and more in-depth information about each release. SmokingStogie quickly became one of the more influential cigar blogs on the internet, known for reviewing preproduction, prerelease, rare, extremely hard-to-find and expensive cigars. I am a co-founder of halfwheel and now serve as an editor for halfwheel.

Related Posts

Null